Spiritual Life Coaching

Guest Post By CATHERINE VAN HERRIN

How Fostering a Personal Spiritual Foundation Will Enhance Your Life

Most people, toward the end of their lives, often reflect on the various successes they’ve enjoyed in life — among these include the happiest times they’ve enjoyed with their families and friends; the funniest, most improbably hilarious situations they’ve found themselves in; and even the greatest books they’ve read or films they’ve seen.

Our “old age,” as we call it, is really a time to look forward to like nothing else — just think about it: Here is a time when, though the rest of the world is still going gangbusters, people can relax, sit back, and really contemplate and reflect on what has been important to them — what their lives have really been about.

If we’re lucky enough to reach our golden years, we’ll have a lot to be thankful for — that is, if we’ve wisely invested in not only our material well-being, but our spiritual life, as well. Because without a strong sense of faith (however we choose to define it) to fall back on or to help back us up, we’d never even experience the kind of satisfaction material success can bring — or find much of anything else to be thankful for, either.

To determine whether you are spiritually successful, ask yourself these three integral, but simple questions — (and don’t mull it over; just answer with whatever first jumps to mind):

  • To whom, or what, do you turn in times of desperation, pain, hunger, sorrow, grief, or fear?
  • Does your answer satisfy you? How does it make you feel? Does it make you feel protected? Does it provide you with a sense of reward, gratification, or even peacefulness?
  • How often do you ask yourself this question and reflect on the answer — without being prompted, as in this quiz?

Though there is no right or wrong answer to these questions, it should certainly give you a sense of where you are, so to speak, spiritually. It’s healthy food for thought. It’s a way to “check in” — even for just a moment — to bring yourself back to the very foundation, the bedrock, of who you are, how you see yourself, and the ways in which you relate to the world, both material and incorporeal.

Though it makes no difference how a person defines his or her personal spirituality, it’s certainly important that he or she actually has one to define!

Consider this: Our world, just in the past few years, has changed dramatically and in ways that are simply irrevocable. Just the United States alone has gone through monumental and near-constant man-made and natural disasters of historic proportion.

This kind of massive onslaught affecting our world and the people among us does bring pause to most of us; it makes us consider our own spirituality, which in turn naturally causes us to want to come closer to that source. And, beyond that, the miracle of a spiritually successful life then keeps its momentum, next triggering our compassion in ways that lead us to want to help others in any of the myriad ways we can.

Of course we don’t all have to go out and become clerics, priests, or start an ashram or commune in some distant desert or verdant wonderland to be able to relate to ourselves as spiritual beings, or to strive to become spiritually successful. That’s the beautiful simplicity of the source of all spirituality: It doesn’t “show itself”: It manifests itself and grows within us in a naturally quiet manner. It doesn’t “boast.”

Think about another idea for a moment: The biology inside all of us is exactly the same; the only real difference between every single person, the only thing that makes us all unique, is our scientific “thumbprint,” our DNA. Other than that, there just aren’t any differences.

So why, we wonder, do we seem so afraid of each other? Why do we see so much violence in the world, so much senseless, self-destructive behavior?

Sometimes the only “answer” for when there seem to be no answers, as with questions of this magnitude, goes something like this: The only way fear can exist is through an absence of what, for these purposes, we will call “God.” And fear spreads, like a disease; it also feeds off of itself, creating chaos and mayhem wherever it goes and whomever it touches.

In terms of spirituality, there just isn’t any “right” or “wrong.” To be spiritual means to feel enlightened; to have the sense that you are only part of a much larger plan in life, along with your fellow human beings. It means to strive to live an honest life and to try, at every opportunity, to help those in need. It means that you have a “knowing”– or at the very least, the strength of a faith — that you aren’t alone in this often seemingly crazy, convoluted, and chaotic Universe.

If you have been lucky enough to recognize and enjoy a full spiritual life, you’ll be one of those who, at the end of your life, will likely realize that even if you never had that so-called “successful business”; even though you worked hard all your life and never achieved what you thought was a good standard of living; or even if you didn’t get to take that Alaskan cruise you always wanted, you can rest assured that none of those things will matter — because as long as you have had a strong spiritual foundation, you truly will have had it all.

How Fostering a Personal Spiritual Foundation Will Enhance Your Life

(935 words)

By CATHERINE VAN HERRIN

Most people, toward the end of their lives, often reflect on the various successes they’ve enjoyed in life — among these include the happiest times they’ve enjoyed with their families and friends; the funniest, most improbably hilarious situations they’ve found themselves in; and even the greatest books they’ve read or films they’ve seen.

Our “old age,” as we call it, is really a time to look forward to like nothing else — just think about it: Here is a time when, though the rest of the world is still going gangbusters, people can relax, sit back, and really contemplate and reflect on what has been important to them — what their lives have really been about.

If we’re lucky enough to reach our golden years, we’ll have a lot to be thankful for — that is, if we’ve wisely invested in not only our material well-being, but our spiritual life, as well. Because without a strong sense of faith (however we choose to define it) to fall back on or to help back us up, we’d never even experience the kind of satisfaction material success can bring — or find much of anything else to be thankful for, either.

To determine whether you are spiritually successful, ask yourself these three integral, but simple questions — (and don’t mull it over; just answer with whatever first jumps to mind):

  • To whom, or what, do you turn in times of desperation, pain, hunger, sorrow, grief, or fear?
  • Does your answer satisfy you? How does it make you feel? Does it make you feel protected? Does it provide you with a sense of reward, gratification, or even peacefulness?
  • How often do you ask yourself this question and reflect on the answer — without being prompted, as in this quiz?

Though there is no right or wrong answer to these questions, it should certainly give you a sense of where you are, so to speak, spiritually. It’s healthy food for thought. It’s a way to “check in” — even for just a moment — to bring yourself back to the very foundation, the bedrock, of who you are, how you see yourself, and the ways in which you relate to the world, both material and incorporeal.

Though it makes no difference how a person defines his or her personal spirituality, it’s certainly important that he or she actually has one to define!

Consider this: Our world, just in the past few years, has changed dramatically and in ways that are simply irrevocable. Just the United States alone has gone through monumental and near-constant man-made and natural disasters of historic proportion.

This kind of massive onslaught affecting our world and the people among us does bring pause to most of us; it makes us consider our own spirituality, which in turn naturally causes us to want to come closer to that source. And, beyond that, the miracle of a spiritually successful life then keeps its momentum, next triggering our compassion in ways that lead us to want to help others in any of the myriad ways we can.

Of course we don’t all have to go out and become clerics, priests, or start an ashram or commune in some distant desert or verdant wonderland to be able to relate to ourselves as spiritual beings, or to strive to become spiritually successful. That’s the beautiful simplicity of the source of all spirituality: It doesn’t “show itself”: It manifests itself and grows within us in a naturally quiet manner. It doesn’t “boast.”

Think about another idea for a moment: The biology inside all of us is exactly the same; the only real difference between every single person, the only thing that makes us all unique, is our scientific “thumbprint,” our DNA. Other than that, there just aren’t any differences.

So why, we wonder, do we seem so afraid of each other? Why do we see so much violence in the world, so much senseless, self-destructive behavior?

Sometimes the only “answer” for when there seem to be no answers, as with questions of this magnitude, goes something like this: The only way fear can exist is through an absence of what, for these purposes, we will call “God.” And fear spreads, like a disease; it also feeds off of itself, creating chaos and mayhem wherever it goes and whomever it touches.

In terms of spirituality, there just isn’t any “right” or “wrong.” To be spiritual means to feel enlightened; to have the sense that you are only part of a much larger plan in life, along with your fellow human beings. It means to strive to live an honest life and to try, at every opportunity, to help those in need. It means that you have a “knowing”– or at the very least, the strength of a faith — that you aren’t alone in this often seemingly crazy, convoluted, and chaotic Universe.

If you have been lucky enough to recognize and enjoy a full spiritual life, you’ll be one of those who, at the endHow Fostering a Personal Spiritual Foundation Will Enhance Your Life

(935 words)

By CATHERINE VAN HERRIN

Most people, toward the end of their lives, often reflect on the various successes they’ve enjoyed in life — among these include the happiest times they’ve enjoyed with their families and friends; the funniest, most improbably hilarious situations they’ve found themselves in; and even the greatest books they’ve read or films they’ve seen.

Our “old age,” as we call it, is really a time to look forward to like nothing else — just think about it: Here is a time when, though the rest of the world is still going gangbusters, people can relax, sit back, and really contemplate and reflect on what has been important to them — what their lives have really been about.

If we’re lucky enough to reach our golden years, we’ll have a lot to be thankful for — that is, if we’ve wisely invested in not only our material well-being, but our spiritual life, as well. Because without a strong sense of faith (however we choose to define it) to fall back on or to help back us up, we’d never even experience the kind of satisfaction material success can bring — or find much of anything else to be thankful for, either.

To determine whether you are spiritually successful, ask yourself these three integral, but simple questions — (and don’t mull it over; just answer with whatever first jumps to mind):

  • To whom, or what, do you turn in times of desperation, pain, hunger, sorrow, grief, or fear?
  • Does your answer satisfy you? How does it make you feel? Does it make you feel protected? Does it provide you with a sense of reward, gratification, or even peacefulness?
  • How often do you ask yourself this question and reflect on the answer — without being prompted, as in this quiz?

Though there is no right or wrong answer to these questions, it should certainly give you a sense of where you are, so to speak, spiritually. It’s healthy food for thought. It’s a way to “check in” — even for just a moment — to bring yourself back to the very foundation, the bedrock, of who you are, how you see yourself, and the ways in which you relate to the world, both material and incorporeal.

Though it makes no difference how a person defines his or her personal spirituality, it’s certainly important that he or she actually has one to define!

Consider this: Our world, just in the past few years, has changed dramatically and in ways that are simply irrevocable. Just the United States alone has gone through monumental and near-constant man-made and natural disasters of historic proportion.

This kind of massive onslaught affecting our world and the people among us does bring pause to most of us; it makes us consider our own spirituality, which in turn naturally causes us to want to come closer to that source. And, beyond that, the miracle of a spiritually successful life then keeps its momentum, next triggering our compassion in ways that lead us to want to help others in any of the myriad ways we can.

Of course we don’t all have to go out and become clerics, priests, or start an ashram or commune in some distant desert or verdant wonderland to be able to relate to ourselves as spiritual beings, or to strive to become spiritually successful. That’s the beautiful simplicity of the source of all spirituality: It doesn’t “show itself”: It manifests itself and grows within us in a naturally quiet manner. It doesn’t “boast.”

Think about another idea for a moment: The biology inside all of us is exactly the same; the only real difference between every single person, the only thing that makes us all unique, is our scientific “thumbprint,” our DNA. Other than that, there just aren’t any differences.

So why, we wonder, do we seem so afraid of each other? Why do we see so much violence in the world, so much senseless, self-destructive behavior?

Sometimes the only “answer” for when there seem to be no answers, as with questions of this magnitude, goes something like this: The only way fear can exist is through an absence of what, for these purposes, we will call “God.” And fear spreads, like a disease; it also feeds off of itself, creating chaos and mayhem wherever it goes and whomever it touches.

In terms of spirituality, there just isn’t any “right” or “wrong.” To be spiritual means to feel enlightened; to have the sense that you are only part of a much larger plan in life, along with your fellow human beings. It means to strive to live an honest life and to try, at every opportunity, to help those in need. It means that you have a “knowing”– or at the very least, the strength of a faith — that you aren’t alone in this often seemingly crazy, convoluted, and chaotic Universe.

If you have been lucky enough to recognize and enjoy a full spiritual life, you’ll be one of those who, at the end of your life, will likely realize that even if you never had that so-called “successful business”; even though you worked hard all your life and never achieved what you thought was a good standard of living; or even if you didn’t get to take that Alaskan cruise you always wanted, you can rest assured that none of those things will matter — because as long as you have had a strong spiritual foundation, you truly will have had it all. of your life, will likely realize that even if you never had that so-called “successful business”; even though you worked hard all your life and never achieved what you thought was a good standard of living; or even if you didn’t get to take that Alaskan cruise you always wanted, you can rest assured that none of those things will matter — because as long as you have had a strong spiritual foundation, you truly will have had it all.

Comments

  1. I really appreciate this articles…. GOD is good all the time… Thanks for this articles… visit also this Wright? Their Life Purpose and Spirituality is so great…

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